EFS Interview with Artdigiland

Rouzbeh Rashidi and Maximilian Le Cain were interviewed by Enzo Cillo and Federica Iodice for Artdigiland. The interview is in two parts and also available in Italian (special thanks to Silvia Tarquini). This interview is part of an Artdigiland project supported by Academy of Fine Arts of Naples, Italy. Read the first part HERE

Altered States


Homo Sapiens Project (191-199) by Rouzbeh Rashidi, Dean Kavanagh & Maximilian Le Cain and INCUBUS by Atoosa PourHosseini have been selected for the exhibition in Altered States. Altered States is an immersive multi-screen show of the latest experimental film and video work curated by the Hastings-based filmmakers Toby Tatum and Mark French. ALTERED STATES Electro Studios, Seaside Road, West St Leonards, TN38 0AL Sat 29 August from 6pm – 10pm Sun 30 August from 2pm – 6pm.

More info HERE

EFS @ Open Night Cinema in August 2015



Experimental Film Society in association with Open Night Cinema will present two programmes of underground film/expanded cinema each Saturday for the first two weeks of August 2015. The programmes will be presented in a large, atmospheric, industrial space. EFS members Rouzbeh Rashidi, Dean Kavanagh, Maximilian Le Cain and Michael Higgins will specifically design, present and document each event, engaging fully with the site and the audience. The results of this documentation will emerge as part of their mammoth upcoming feature film Homo Sapiens Project 200. The goal is to employ this vortex-like space as a projection and shooting location that functions as a living organism containing the memories of a future cinema. Each of these programmes will highlight the unique aspect of the abilities that each individual filmmaker possesses and, in creating this black hole of cinema, they will exorcise the elements and atmospheres, colliding them into what will become Homo Sapiens Project 200.


Saturday 1st August 2015:

1_Murder (2014) By Michael Higgins / Ireland / 5mins
2_Funnel Web Family (2013) By Michael Higgins / Ireland / 14mins 
3_Friends with Johnny Kline (2015) By Dean Kavanagh / Ireland / 17:30mins 
4_Homo Sapiens Project (97) (2012) By Rouzbeh Rashidi / Ireland / 20mins
5_Night Regulation (2014) By Maximilian Le cain /  USA-Ireland / 25mins


Saturday 8th August 2015:

Homo Sapiens Project (174, 191-199) (2014-2015) By Rouzbeh Rashidi, Dean Kavanagh & Maximilian Le cain / Ireland

Michael Higgins In Focus: The Illuminated Room - An expanded cinema event.


“A Brief Factual History of EFS”


Experimental Film Society (EFS) is an independent, not-for-profit entity specializing in avant-garde, independent and no/low budget filmmaking. I founded it 2000 in Tehran and it has been based in Dublin, Ireland since 2004. It unites works by a number of filmmakers scattered across the globe whose films are distinguished by an uncompromising devotion to personal, experimental cinema. It began as an organization for producing and archiving films, which it still does. But since 2011 one of its main activities has been organizing and promoting screenings of EFS work in venues all over the world. In July 2015 the 40th EFS screening took place in Berlin, Germany. As well as screenings, EFS has organized live cinema events, installations and exhibitions. It has an online archive of shorts and a VOD site for features. Its side-projects include the online journal EFS Publications and the noise project Cinema Cyanide. Its current membership stands at nine filmmakers.

There are no strictly defined rules governing EFS films, but most works share some general principles or characteristics. One is the avoidance of a script or any form of written plan. Films that grow from images rather than words have their own particular qualities. By extension, EFS filmmakers share an exploratory, improvisational approach to filmmaking. They often don’t know exactly what the film they’re making is until the last day of editing. They control the film less than it controls them. EFS films are made in complete creative freedom and the vast majority of them are self-funded, although recently some of us have benefited from grant funding. The equipment used tends to be basic and inexpensive: DSLR cameras, 8 and 16mm film, web-cameras, mobile phone cameras, DV and even VHS. A considered relationship with the material specificity of each format and its characteristics is very important to us. Our films are often crafted from the places and people we encounter in our everyday lives and travels, although these are viewed through a poetic prism rather than with a documentary approach. Plots are usually very abstract with little or no dialogue.

EFS films are all massively personal and, in a sense, not complete. They don’t present the viewer with a neatly defined narrative universe or dictate exactly what he or she should feel at each moment. Their relationship with the audience is perhaps similar to a song that provides only the bass and drum line, leaving the listener to add his or her melodies. They remain open enough for the public to remain themselves while watching, instead of being ‘taken out of themselves’. These films are about images and the progression of images. When there’s sound or music, they’re about the interaction of sound and image. Cinema itself is always the subject, experimenting with its forms. Not necessarily pushing its limits, because I believe the limits of cinema have already been reached by Structuralist filmmakers like Sharits, or by Garrel’s early films, for instance. You can’t go beyond that. But if a filmmaker’s experiments are true to his or her perception and personality, the medium’s possibilities are constantly renewed.

When I started to make films back in January 2000 in Tehran, I felt that there were three main categories of filmmaking to choose from and be in. One was the mainstream cinema, with a strong emphasis on storytelling, either fiction or documentary. The second category was the underground/guerilla type cinema, which was bolder in its subject matter and embraced micro-budget techniques, but was essentially not that different from films in the first category except for its lack of money. I liked their DIY techniques, but that was about all. The third category was video art, which often had an explicit ideological agenda, be it social, political or religious. Some works were more personal and poetic, which I preferred. But this work came out of a visual arts context, whereas I was attracted to cinema itself. I felt that I didn’t belong to any of these groups. I wanted to do something very experimental within cinema, influenced as I was by history of film. I needed to establish a system of making and screening such films. That was the basic motivation behind EFS. So in 2000 I founded Experimental Film Society with my fellow cinematographer Mohammad Nick Dell. I made films in Iran until 2004 and then I moved to Ireland.

During my filmmaking adventures in Iran I would organise private screenings of new work (my own and films by others) for friends and similar people. During that time I realised that you simply cannot expect any kind of support from film festivals or government agencies. If you want to survive then you must create the culture that you want to be part of, and build it yourself from scratch. Naturally it is not a one-man job, therefore you most definitely need an experimental film collective in order to achieve this goal.

When I came to Dublin, I continued making films. As time passed, I came into contact with like-minded filmmakers in Ireland and EFS started to grow again. Although an international entity, it must be admitted that Iran and Ireland form the two definite geographical poles of EFS. The former members from its early days are, of course, all Iranian: Pouya Ahmadi, Mohammad Nick Dell, Mahdi Safarali, Behzad Haki, Ali Vakilian. In recent years, EFS has enjoyed a fruitful collaboration with Hamid Shams Javi and Kamyar Kordestani. Amongst current members are Bahar Samadi (who collaborates with another former member, Navid Salajegheh) and Dublin-based Atoosa Pour Hosseini.

Arriving in Ireland, I found myself in some ways in a similar situation to that which I had experienced in Iran: Irish film history can boast of a few notable figures in experimental film but there was never a real tradition of alternative film. There was nothing happening I could relate to or fit into as a filmmaker. In the years since, the work done by EFS members Dean Kavanagh, Michael Higgins, Maximilian Le Cain and me has been described as bringing a new experimental energy into Irish filmmaking. Although still at the margins, our efforts are becoming increasingly noticed in Ireland. The Irish connections continue: I met Swiss member Jann Clavadetscher when he was living in Dublin in 2005. In the past year, he has again moved from Zurich to Dublin. Spanish artist, filmmaker, curator and authority on paracinema Esperanza Collado had moved back to Spain when I first met her. But she spent several years in Dublin in the late 2000s, during which time her work as a writer and curator was immensely important in fostering an experimental film culture in Ireland. In fact, only Jason Marsh, who lives in Wales, has no connections with either Iran or Ireland.

Ultimately, though, I don’t believe in national cinema. I only believe in the ‘continent of cinema’ that all of our films belong to. They belong to everyone from any nationality. I never felt like I belonged to any specific place or culture. I think EFS films are universal and can be understood by any creature including extra-terrestrial life. As far as I am concerned, EFS could just as well be on Mars and we would still make the exact same type of films.


Rouzbeh Rashidi (July 2015)


Special thanks to Maximilian Le Cain and Dean Kavanagh

EFS @ Lichtenberg Studios, Berlin

EFS members Dean Kavanagh, Rouzbeh Rashidi, Atoosa Pour Hosseini and Maximilian Le Cain have just finished a highly productive week-long residency at Lichtenberg Studios, Berlin. Many thanks to Uwe Jonas at Lichtenberg Studios and The Arts Council of Ireland for a travel grant that made this possible. And, above all, a huge thank you to the amazing Michael Freerix who arranged not only the residency but the two screenings we had while in Berlin.

EFS @ Phantoscope


Coming to Triskel Christchurch Cinema, Cork on Saturday July 11th at 6pm...

A knockout double bill of Michael Higgins' At One Fell Swoop & Dean Kavanagh's Polar Nights. Tickets on sale.

At One Fell Swoop (2015) by Michael Higgins

Ireland / 70 mins / Black & White

At One Fell Swoop deals with a stonemason (Cillian Roche) and his metamorphic wander through rural Ireland. In passing he slips through the film’s frames into a re-imagining of his surroundings in which he finds himself trapped on an intense cataclastic path towards a dead end. Photographed on expired 16mm black and white film and entirely hand-processed, At One Fell Swoop resembles a phantom-like film lodged amid multiple stratums of time and space. At One Fell Swoop was funded by Arts Council of Ireland.

Dublin based Michael Higgins has been making films for ten years. He is interested in using the filmmaking process to rupture the reality of the everyday, bringing to light alternative ways of seeing and experiencing. His 2013 feature Smolt won the IndieCork Award for Innovation in Irish Feature Filmmaking. www.mgmh.me


Polar Nights (2014) by Dean Kavanagh 

Ireland / 61 mins / Colour

Polar Nights is a formalistic journey of image and sound that plunges viewers into the depths of the Arctic where a small town and its inhabitants live day-to-day lives in the dark. The main protagonist is perhaps the movie itself, which leads to the question of whether these characters were ever real or just delusions bleeding in from the cold.

Dean Kavanagh is an independent experimental filmmaker from Wicklow. He became a member of EFS in 2008. Since then he has completed over 50 short films and 5 at feature length, which have been screened worldwide. His work is intensely visual, creating detailed atmospheres that respond to the interaction between space, time and the human body. Rural and domestic themes diaphanously sheath a rigorously formalistic interplay between sound and image. www.deankavanagh.com

Two EFS Programmes in Berlin, July 2015

Experimental Film Society (EFS) filmmakers Rouzbeh Rashidi, Dean Kavanagh, Maximilian Le Cain and visual artist Atoosa Pour Hosseini will be in Berlin to introduce two programmes of short films that give an intense overview of the range and formally challenging thrust of EFS filmmaking. The screenings will take place at Lichtblick-Kino and regenbogenKINO.




Programme 1 @ Lichtblick-Kino 4th July 8PM

1_Dimensions (2013) By Atoosa Pour Hosseini / Ireland / 6mins
2_The Illuminating Gas (2012) By Esperanza Collado / Spain / 7:30mins 
3_Murder (2014) By Michael Higgins / Ireland / 5mins
4_Friends with Johnny Kline (2015) By Dean Kavanagh / Ireland / 17:30mins
5_67-69-Take 5 (2015) By Maximilian Le cain Ireland-Spain / 14mins 
6_Homo Sapiens Project (150) (2013) By Rouzbeh Rashidi / Ireland / 36mins

Total Running Time: 86mins



Programme 2 @ regenbogenKINO 5th July 8PM

1_Teaser (2015) By Jann Clavadetscher / Ireland / 3mins 
2_W.E (2014) By Bahar Samadi / France / 5mins
3_On The Way (2013) By Bahar Samadi / France / 3mins 
4_Pitpony (2014) By Jason Marsh / UK / 3:30mins 
5_Last Phase (2014) By Atoosa Pour Hosseini / Ireland / 2mins
6_Incubus (2014) By Atoosa Pour Hosseini / Ireland / 1:30mins
7_Luminosity (2) (2013) By Atoosa Pour Hosseini / Ireland / 2:30mins
8_Funnel Web Family (2013) By Michael Higgins / Ireland / 14mins
9_Homo Sapiens Project (176) (2014) By Rashidi & Kavanagh / Ireland / 12mins
10_Homo Sapiens Project (191-199) (2015) By Rashidi, Kavanagh & Le Cain / Ireland / 15:30mins
11_Brine Twice Daily (2015) By Maximilian Le cain/Vicky Langan Ireland / 20mins

Total Running Time: 82mins 

EFS is a not-for-profit entity that promotes, archives and sometimes produces work by a group of filmmakers operating in several different countries. Although each member has a distinctive vision, they are united by an uncompromising devotion to personal, experimental cinema. They have in common an exploratory approach to filmmaking where films emerge from the interplay of sound, image and atmosphere rather than traditional storytelling techniques. 

EFS was founded in 2000 by Dublin-based filmmaker Rouzbeh Rashidi, who continues to curate and run it. Although an international organization, EFS is notably at the centre of a new wave of Irish experimental filmmaking and crucial in fostering a radical emerging Iranian underground cinema.

For more details and profiles of individual filmmakers, please visit:

EFS presents two Performances in Temple Bar Gallery + Studios


Tuesday 30th June 2015 | 6:30 to 8:30 pm
Studio 6 | Free admission, all welcome.

Please click here to book your free ticket to this event.

Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, 5-9 Temple Bar, Dublin 2.

The next Experimental Film Society (EFS) event, taking place at Temple Bar Gallery + Studios under the Studio 6 Open programme, foregrounds an important aspect of several EFS members’ work: the intersection of performance and cinema. This event will consist of two live performances, one by Esperanza Collado and one by Atoosa Pour Hosseini with Irene Murphy and Mick O’Shea.

Esperanza Collado is an artist, curator and internationally recognized authority on paracinema. She will be presenting her acclaimed performance We Only Guarantee The Dinosaurs in Ireland for the first time. Filmmaker Jodie Mack wrote: ‘We Only Guarantee The Dinosaurs enchanted the audience with carefully-constructed choreography guiding a series of objects through an earnest investigation of the essence of CINEMA (PAST, PRESENT, POST) and its possibilities. On/off screen space dissolved. Time and space unfolded in simple gestures… The future of a thriving film art relies upon efforts like [this].’

For more information on Esperanza Collado, please visit: esperanzacollado.org

Atoosa Pour Hosseini is a Dublin-based artist whose work explores questions around illusion, reality and perception. She attempts to convey and examine several recurring themes that relate to location, reflection, nostalgia and her relationship with her surroundings. Her works creates other worlds - mysterious, opaque and remindful of places we perceive we might recall or vaguely recollect from dreams or memory. Moving image performance is an important part of this process.

For more information on Atoosa Pour Hosseini, please visit: atoosapourhosseini.com

She will be joined in this perfromance by Cork-based artists Mick O’Shea and Irene Murphy. Mick O‘Shea’s works spring from his essential experience in drawing. His mediums include sculpture, drawing, sound and cooking. He has been instrumental in establishing a vibrant sound art scene in Cork. Irene Murphy’s work questions the role of the artist, creative space, and engages with a broader concept of creativity. A common link in her art is ideas about performativeness, site specificity and communality with Murphy’s art acts being private interventions into public space. The perforamnce is entitled Clandestine

EFS is a not-for-profit entity that promotes, archives and sometimes produces work by a dozen filmmakers operating in several different countries. Although each member has a distinctive vision, they are united by an uncompromising devotion to personal, experimental cinema. They have in common an exploratory approach to filmmaking where films emerge from the interplay of sound, image and atmosphere rather than traditional storytelling techniques. EFS was founded by Dublin-based filmmaker Rouzbeh Rashidi, who continues to curate and run the organization.

More info:

Forbidden Symmetries @ CINEPHILES! QUEZON CITY


from CINEPHILES!

"We are inviting you all to attend our 2nd Cinemalibre film club screening this year on May 30, 2015 (Saturday). Please check the program below for details.

CINEMALIBRE FILM CLUB SCREENING PROGRAM
Venue: UP Cine Adarna - Videotheque, UP DILIMAN, QUEZON CITY
Date: MAY 30, 2015 (Saturday)
Time: 1230 PM - onwards

FREE ADMISSION
: Open to public (nonmembers of the group)
: Bring food & drinks

SCREENING SCHEDULE

THAI EXCHANGE 
[films in response to recent political crisis in Thailand]
(12:30 - 1:45 PM)

FILMMAKER IN FOCUS #1: Chulayarnnon Siriphol

A Brief History of Memory (2010) - 14 mins 
Planking (2012) - 3 mins
Myth of Modernity (2014) - 16 mins

FILMMAKER IN FOCUS #2: Taiki Sakpisit

A Ripe Volcano (2011) - 15 mins 
Time of the Last Persecution (2012) - 7.5 mins
The Age of Anxiety (2013) - 14 mins

* * * *

EUROPEAN EXCHANGE 
[post-filmic vaguard cinema from Europe]
(2:00 - 4:15 PM)

FILMMAKER IN FOCUS: Scott Barley

Nightwalk (2013) - 6 mins 
Irresolute (2013) - 2 mins
Eventfall (2015) - 6 mins 
Shadows (2015) - 20 mins

> Experimental Feature: Forbidden Symmetries (Rouzbeh Rashidi, Dean Kavanagh & Maximilian Le Cain / Ireland / 2014) - 97 mins

> Special Short: Neuralgia (Michael Allen / 2014) - 3 mins

* * * *

LOCAL EXCHANGE
[local experimental exigencies]
4:30 - onwards

FILMMAKER IN FOCUS: Christian Tablazon

What is a Day - 16 mins
Translación - 22 mins
Sala - 56 mins

> Special short: Iris (Mike Esteves / 2015) - 9 mins

* * * *

SPECIAL THANKS TO Thai film critic Wiwat Filmsick Lertwiwatwongsa for the Thai exchange selection!

For further inquiries, contact me, Adrian D. Mendizabal (0906-430-2809) or Epoy P. Deyto (0906 - 425 - 9019)"

More info HERE

Michael Higgins Interview with 103.2 Dublin City FM

Experimental Film Society member Michael Higgins was interviewed by Edwina Neilan from 103.2 Dublin City FM about the EFS approach of filmmaking and personal film practise. (May 2015)

Experimental Film Society - Video On Demand


Over the past five years, four prolific underground filmmakers have emerged to define a new and distinctive visionary strain of filmmaking in Ireland. Under the banner of Experimental Film Society, Rouzbeh Rashidi, Dean Kavanagh, Michael Higgins and Maximilian Le Cain have forged a defiantly personal and marginal cinema that is fast becoming recognized as "an important new direction" (Donal Foreman, Estudios Irlandeses- Read HERE) in Irish film. Sharing an exploratory approach to filmmaking where films emerge from the interplay of sound, image and atmosphere rather than traditional storytelling techniques, their work has been singled out for its radical formal qualities and poetic sensibility. Made with low or, most often, no budgets, this is filmmaking at its most challenging and independent. 

Now, for the first time, their archive of forty-three feature and medium length films is available on VOD to stream or download. Explore this unique catalogue of work HERE.

Trailer HERE

Any proceeds from the online rental or sale of these films will go towards funding future Experimental Film Society projects.

About the filmmakers:

Rouzbeh Rashidi

Rouzbeh Rashidi is an Iranian filmmaker based in Dublin. He has been making films since 2000 when he founded the Experimental Film Society in Tehran. Since then, he has worked completely apart from any mainstream conceptions of filmmaking. He strives to escape the stereotypes of conventional storytelling and instead roots his cinematic style in a poetic interaction of image and sound. He generally eschews scriptwriting, seeing the process of making moving images as exploration rather than illustration. His work is also deeply engaged with film history. Spooool (Read HERE) acclaimed his recent feature Ten Years in the Sun, premiered at this year's Dublin International Film Festival (JDIFF), as "a bold and unconventional film… One of the standout films from this year's JDIFF". 


Dean Kavanagh

Dean Kavanagh is an independent experimental filmmaker from Wicklow, Ireland. He became a member of the international filmmaking collective Experimental Film Society in 2008. Since then he has completed over 50 short films and 5 at feature length, which have been screened worldwide. His work is intensely visual, creating detailed atmospheres that respond to the interaction between space, time and the human body. Rural and domestic themes diaphanously sheath a rigorously formalistic interplay between sound and image.


Michael Higgins

Dublin based Michael Higgins has been making films for ten years. He is interested in using the filmmaking process to rupture the reality of the everyday, bringing to light alternative ways of seeing and experiencing. He has recently premiered his ninth feature film, At One Fell Swoop.


Maximilian Le Cain

Maximilian Le Cain is an experimental filmmaker based in Cork, Ireland. He makes cinematic ruins that tear themselves apart as they are put together. He frequently works in partnership with sound/performance artist Vicky Langan. He also has collaborative projects with Esperanza Collado (Operation Rewrite) and Karen Power (Gorging Limpet). He is currently completing post-production on the feature film Cloud of Skin.


Experimental Film Society is an independent, not-for-profit entity specializing in avant-garde, independent and no/low budget filmmaking. It was founded in 2000 in Tehran, Iran by Rouzbeh Rashidi and has been based in Dublin, Ireland since 2004. It unites works by eight filmmakers scattered across the globe, whose films are distinguished by an uncompromising devotion to personal, experimental cinema. Although an international organization, Experimental Film Society is notably at the centre of a new wave of Irish experimental filmmaking and crucial in fostering a radical emerging Iranian underground cinema.

Horror and Science-Fiction Film List


“In late 2013 I compiled a very comprehensive list of “12 Favourite Filmmakers” by members of EFS and friends, along with many associates, filmmakers, film critics, and programmers. This list really enlightened me as it drew my attention to many films and directors I had never heard of. These lists still function as a goldmine of information for myself and many others, so once again I wanted to thank all of the wonderful people who contributed.

Now, I want to compile another list specifically on Horror and Science-Fiction cinema. Perhaps the reason for such a list lies in my preoccupation and constant engagement with these two genres and how they can be reconstructed and dissolved in the realm of experimental filmmaking. I want to ask contributors to provide a list of exactly 24 films (12 of their favourite horror and 12 of their favourite science-fiction) to be published on the newly launched EFS Publications. My old list can be read HERE . If you are interested please submit your list to experimentalfilmsociety@gmail.com and I’ll be more than glad to consider publishing it. Thank you very much indeed!” Rouzbeh Rashidi

Polar Nights + At One Fell Swoop premiere @ TBG+S


Monday 13th April 2015 | 6pm

Studio 6 | Free admission, all welcome

Temple Bar Gallery + Studios / 5 - 9 Temple Bar / Dublin 2 / Ireland


The fourth of six bi-monthly Experimental Film Society (EFS) screenings, taking place at Temple Bar Gallery + Studios under the Studio 6 Open programme, is a very special event: a double world premiere of new feature films by Dean Kavanagh and Micheal Higgins, two Irish-based members of EFS. Both filmmakers will be present at the screening.


Polar Nights (2014) by Dean Kavanagh

Ireland / 61 mins / Colour

Polar Nights is a formalistic journey of image and sound that plunges viewers into the depths of the Arctic where a small town and its inhabitants live day-to-day lives in the dark. The main protagonist is perhaps the movie itself, which leads to the question of whether these characters were ever real or just delusions bleeding in from the cold.

Dean Kavanagh is an independent experimental filmmaker from Wicklow. He became a member of EFS in 2008. Since then he has completed over 50 short films and 5 at feature length, which have been screened worldwide. His work is intensely visual, creating detailed atmospheres that respond to the interaction between space, time and the human body. Rural and domestic themes diaphanously sheath a rigorously formalistic interplay between sound and image.



At One Fell Swoop (2015) by Michael Higgins

Ireland / 70 mins / Black & White

At One Fell Swoop deals with a stonemason (Cillian Roche) and his metamorphic wander through rural Ireland. In passing he slips through the film’s frames into a re-imagining of his surroundings in which he finds himself trapped on an intense cataclastic path towards a dead end. Photographed on expired 16mm black and white film and entirely hand-processed, At One Fell Swoop resembles a phantom-like film lodged amid multiple stratums of time and space. At One Fell Swoop was funded by Arts Council of Ireland.

Dublin based Michael Higgins has been making films for ten years. He is interested in using the filmmaking process to rupture the reality of the everyday, bringing to light alternative ways of seeing and experiencing. His 2013 feature Smolt won the IndieCork Award for Innovation in Irish Feature Filmmaking.



EFS is a not-for-profit entity that promotes, archives and sometimes produces work by a dozen filmmakers operating in several different countries. Although each member has a distinctive vision, they are united by an uncompromising devotion to personal, experimental cinema. They have in common an exploratory approach to filmmaking where films emerge from the interplay of sound, image and atmosphere rather than traditional storytelling techniques. EFS was founded by Dublin-based filmmaker Rouzbeh Rashidi, who continues to curate and run the organization.

More info:

THANK YOU JDIFF


Ten Years In The Sun was premiered last night in Jameson Dublin International Film Festival and I simply could not have asked for a better audience or screening scenario. We almost had a full house and the projection and sound were both flawless. It was the first time one of my films was projected from DCP in the wonderful Lighthouse Cinema. I had a Q&A with James Armstrong from NCAD who very kindly watched a number of my films, including Ten Years beforehand, in order to generate a context for the audience. I continued to chat with audience members until very late last night and I am quite overwhelmed by their amazing feedback and generosity. None of this would have been possible without the tremendous support of Gráinne Humphreys who gave me this platform to present my film in her great festival, so my gratitude goes to her. Special thanks to all of the audience who made it to the screening (some of them travelled from different cities) and also to my cast and crew, without their support the film could not have been made. Thank you all! Onwards!

Rouzbeh Rashidi

"Photographer: Simon Lazewski"

Ten Years In The Sun to premiere @ JDIFF


Premiere, Friday, March 27th, 8pm in JDIFF. Book your ticket HERE

Film Ireland: Ten Years In The Sun

Film Ireland published a small article about TEN YEARS IN THE SUN. The film itself will receive its World Premiere this Friday (March 27th, 8PM) at Light House Cinema, as part of the Irish Official Selection at Jameson Dublin International Film Festival. Read HERE

Dean Kavanagh on Ten Years In The Sun


Read the full article by Dean Kavanagh on Rouzbeh Rashidi’s latest feature film Ten Years in the Sun” (2015) on EFS Publications“. The film will have its World Premiere on Friday March 27th, 8PM @ Lighthouse Cinema as part of the Jameson Dublin International Film Festival. Book Tickets Here

TEN YEARS IN THE SUN @ Jameson Dublin International Film Festival



Here is a brand new trailer for TEN YEARS IN THE SUN (2015). The film will be premiered in Jameson Dublin International Film Festival on Friday, March 27th, 8pm at the Light House Cinema. Book your ticket HERE